Special issue on:

Demographic Aspects of the COVID-19 Pandemic and its Consequences

(Vol. 20)

Guest editors: Paola Di Giulio, Anne Goujon, Guillaume Marois and Joshua Goldstein

 

Managing editor: Maria Winkler-Dworak



Research Articles


Effects of income inequality on COVID-19 infections and deaths during the first wave of the pandemic: Evidence from European countries


Human costs of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the major epicenters in Italy

  • SimonGhislandi, Raya Muttarak, Markus Sauerberg, Benedetta Scotti
    Full text | Details

Details & Abstracts



Research Articles


Effects of income inequality on COVID-19 infections and deaths during the first wave of the pandemic: Evidence from European countries

David A. Sánchez-Páez, Centre for Demographic Research (DEMO), Université Catholique de Louvain. Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Journal: Vienna Yearbook of Population Research
Volume: 20, 2022, pages (tbd - online-first)
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2022.res1.1

cite as:
Sánchez-Páez, D. (2021). Effects of income inequality on COVID-19 infections and deaths during the first wave of the pandemic: Evidence from European countries. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, 19. https://doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2022.res1.1

first online: 03.08.2021

Abstract:

Evidence from research on infectious diseases suggests that income inequality is related to higher rates of infection and death in disadvantaged population groups.
Our objective is to examine whether there was an association between income inequality and the numbers of cases and deaths during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in European countries. We determined the duration of the first wave by first smoothing the number of daily cases, and then using a LOESS regression to fit the smoothed trend. Next, we estimated quasi-Poisson regressions. Results from the bivariate models suggest there was a moderate positive association between the Gini index values and the cumulated number of infections and deaths during the first wave, although the statistical significance of this association disappeared
when controls were included. Results from multivariate models suggest that higher numbers of infections and deaths from COVID-19 were associated with countries having more essential workers, larger elderly populations and lower health carecapacities.

Keywords: COVID-19; income inequality; first wave; European countries

PDF


 

Human costs of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the major epicenters in Italy

Simone Ghislandi, Department of Social and Political Sciences, Bocconi University, Milan, Italy
Raya Muttarak, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital (IIASA, OeAW, University of Vienna), Schlossplatz, Laxenburg, Austria
Markus Sauerberg, Vienna Institute of Demography (OeAW), Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital (IIASA, OeAW, University of Vienna), Vienna, Austria
Benedetta Scotti, Department of Social and Political Sciences, Bocconi University, Milan, Italy

Authors are listed in alphabetical order

Journal: Vienna Yearbook of Population Research
Volume: 20, 2022, pages (tbd - online-first)
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2022.res2.1

cite as:
Ghislandi, S., Muttarak, R., Sauerberg, M, and Scotti, B. (2021). Human costs of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in the major epicenters in Italy. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, 19. https://doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2022.res2.1

first online: 21.07.2021

Abstract:
Deaths from COVID-19 can be miscounted due to under-reporting and inaccurate death registration. Mortality is often reported at the national level, which can result in the underestimation of the true scale of the impact of the pandemic since outbreaks tend to be localised. This study exploits all-cause daily death registration data provided by the Italian Statistical Office (ISTAT) from 1 January to 31 October to estimate the excess mortality and the corresponding changes in life expectancy during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Focusing on the five most severely hit provinces in Italy (Bergamo, Brescia, Cremona, Lodi and Piacenza), we calculate the excess mortality in 2020 compared to the average mortality of the years 2015 to 2019. Moreover, we estimate the excess mortality in the first quadrimester of 2020, and the annual life expectancy at birth. The estimated excess deaths show that during this period, mortality was significantly higher than the official mortality statistics for COVID-19. According to our estimates for the first quadrimester, life expectancy in the five provinces declined by 5.4 to 8.1 for men and by 4.1 to 5.8 years for women. In addition, we find that annual life expectancy decreased by 2.4 to 4.1 years for men and by 1.9 to 2.8 years for women compared to the 2015–2019 average. Thus, we conclude that the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic had a substantial impact on population health in the hardest hit areas in Italy.

PDF