Special issue on:

 

Demographic Aspects of Human Wellbeing


Guest editors: Sonja Spitzer, Vanessa Di Lego, Angela Greulich, Raya Muttarak

Managing editor: Maria Winkler-Dworak



Debate


EU and UK targets for healthy life expectancy –are they achievable?


Demography and well-being


Details & Abstracts


Debate


EU and UK targets for healthy life expectancy – are they achievable?

Carol Jagger (corresponding author), Newcastle University, Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Journal: Vienna Yearbook of Population Research
Volume: 19, 2021, pages (tbd - online-first)
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2021.deb01

cite as:
Jagger, C. 2020. "EU and UK targets for healthy life expectancy – are they achievable?" Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2021 (Volume 19): (tbd - online-first).

first online: 16.07.2020

Abstract:

In 2008, the EU Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) set a target of an increase of two healthy life years by 2020. More recently, in 2018, the UK Government set a target to “ensure people can enjoy at least 5 extra healthy, independent years of life by 2035, while narrowing the gap between the experience of the richest and poorest”. This paper reviews the progress the EU member states have made towards meeting this target, and what the UK can learn from their experiences. I conclude that, although the EU target is likely to be reached, the gap in healthy life years between the member states has increased. Past trends in and projections of disability-free life expectancy in England suggest that it will be difficult to achieve an increase of five healthy and independent years of life by 2035.
Keywords: health expectancy; life expectancy; healthy life years; social inequality; European Union

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Demography and well-being

Andrew E. Clark, Paris School of Economics - CNRS, Paris, France

Journal: Vienna Yearbook of Population Research
Volume: 19, 2021, pages (tbd - online-first)
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
doi:10.1553/populationyearbook2021.deb01

cite as:
Clark, A.E. 2021. "Demography and well-being" Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2021 (Volume 19): (tbd - online-first).

first online: 21.01.2021

Abstract:

Demography studies the characteristics of populations. One such characteristic iswell-being: this was the subject of the 2019 Wittgenstein Conference. Here, I discusshow objective well-being domains can be summarised to produce an overall well-being score, and how taking self-reported (subjective) well-being into account mayhelp in this effort. But given that there is more than one type of subjective well-being score, we would want to know which one is “best”. We would also need todecide whose well-being counts, or counts more than that of others. Finally, I brieflymention the potential role of adaptation and social comparisons in the calculationof societal well-being.Keywords:subjective well-being; demography; measurement; policy

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Online access to all volumes:

Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2019 (vol. 17)
Special Issue on:
Population Ageing and Intergenerational Redistribution


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2018 (vol. 16)
Special Issue on:
Broadening demographic horizons


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2017 (vol. 15)
Special Issue on:
Education and fertility in low-fertility settings


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2016 (vol. 14)
Special Issue on:
Population ageing


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (vol. 13)
Special Issue on:
Demographic differential vulnerability to climate-related disasters


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2014 (vol. 12)
Special Issue on:
Health, Education, and Retirement over the Prolonged Life Cycle


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2013 (vol. 11)
Special Issue on:
Determinants of unusual and differential longevity


Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2012 (vol. 10)
Special Issue on:
Education and the Global Fertility Transition