Our institute hosts approximately 30 scientists, 20 technicians, a small administrative team and at any moment about 25 doctoral and diploma students.

Directors

Gianluca Inguglia

Junior Group Leader

Belle

Contact

Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

Location: Postsparkasse

Room: 3rd floor

Biographical sketch

Positions

  • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
  • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
  • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

Education

  • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
  • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
  • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

Funding

ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

    Academic Honors and Awards

    Prizes/awards
    • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
    • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
    • DALITZ DIPLOMA
      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

    Teaching

    • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
    • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

    Research interests

    There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

    My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

    - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
    - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
    - measurement of Vus
    - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
    - Machine learning techniques

    In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

    Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

    My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

    Outreach activities

    -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
    The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
    -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
    Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
    -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
    -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
    The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
    -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

    Further Information

    Full list of publications: [link].
     

    Group leaders

    Gianluca Inguglia

    Junior Group Leader

    Belle

    Contact

    Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

    Location: Postsparkasse

    Room: 3rd floor

    Biographical sketch

    Positions

    • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
    • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
    • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

    Education

    • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
    • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
    • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

    Funding

    ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

    FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

      Academic Honors and Awards

      Prizes/awards
      • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
      • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
      • DALITZ DIPLOMA
        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

      Teaching

      • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
      • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

      Research interests

      There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

      My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

      - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
      - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
      - measurement of Vus
      - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
      - Machine learning techniques

      In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

      Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

      My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

      Outreach activities

      -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
      The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
      -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
      Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
      -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
      -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
      The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
      -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

      Further Information

      Full list of publications: [link].
       

      Research groups

      Belle

      Gianluca Inguglia

      Junior Group Leader

      Belle

      Contact

      Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

      Location: Postsparkasse

      Room: 3rd floor

      Biographical sketch

      Positions

      • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
      • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
      • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

      Education

      • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
      • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
      • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

      Funding

      ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

      FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

        Academic Honors and Awards

        Prizes/awards
        • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
        • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
        • DALITZ DIPLOMA
          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

        Teaching

        • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
        • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

        Research interests

        There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

        My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

        - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
        - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
        - measurement of Vus
        - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
        - Machine learning techniques

        In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

        Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

        My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

        Outreach activities

        -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
        The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
        -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
        Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
        -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
        -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
        The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
        -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

        Further Information

        Full list of publications: [link].
         

        CMS Physics Analysis

        Gianluca Inguglia

        Junior Group Leader

        Belle

        Contact

        Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

        Location: Postsparkasse

        Room: 3rd floor

        Biographical sketch

        Positions

        • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
        • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
        • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

        Education

        • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
        • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
        • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

        Funding

        ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

        FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

          Academic Honors and Awards

          Prizes/awards
          • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
          • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
          • DALITZ DIPLOMA
            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

          Teaching

          • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
          • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

          Research interests

          There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

          My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

          - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
          - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
          - measurement of Vus
          - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
          - Machine learning techniques

          In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

          Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

          My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

          Outreach activities

          -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
          The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
          -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
          Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
          -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
          -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
          The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
          -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

          Further Information

          Full list of publications: [link].
           

          CMS Tracker

          Gianluca Inguglia

          Junior Group Leader

          Belle

          Contact

          Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

          Location: Postsparkasse

          Room: 3rd floor

          Biographical sketch

          Positions

          • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
          • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
          • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

          Education

          • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
          • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
          • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

          Funding

          ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

          FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

            Academic Honors and Awards

            Prizes/awards
            • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
            • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
            • DALITZ DIPLOMA
              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

            Teaching

            • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
            • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

            Research interests

            There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

            My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

            - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
            - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
            - measurement of Vus
            - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
            - Machine learning techniques

            In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

            Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

            My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

            Outreach activities

            -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
            The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
            -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
            Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
            -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
            -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
            The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
            -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

            Further Information

            Full list of publications: [link].
             

            CMS Trigger

            Gianluca Inguglia

            Junior Group Leader

            Belle

            Contact

            Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

            Location: Postsparkasse

            Room: 3rd floor

            Biographical sketch

            Positions

            • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
            • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
            • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

            Education

            • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
            • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
            • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

            Funding

            ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

            FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

              Academic Honors and Awards

              Prizes/awards
              • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
              • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
              • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

              Teaching

              • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
              • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

              Research interests

              There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

              My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

              - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
              - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
              - measurement of Vus
              - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
              - Machine learning techniques

              In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

              Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

              My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

              Outreach activities

              -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
              The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
              -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
              Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
              -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
              -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
              The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
              -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

              Further Information

              Full list of publications: [link].
               

              Detector Development

              Gianluca Inguglia

              Junior Group Leader

              Belle

              Contact

              Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

              Location: Postsparkasse

              Room: 3rd floor

              Biographical sketch

              Positions

              • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
              • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
              • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

              Education

              • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
              • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
              • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

              Funding

              ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

              FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                Academic Honors and Awards

                Prizes/awards
                • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                Teaching

                • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                Research interests

                There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                - measurement of Vus
                - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                - Machine learning techniques

                In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                Outreach activities

                -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                Further Information

                Full list of publications: [link].
                 

                Machine Learning

                Gianluca Inguglia

                Junior Group Leader

                Belle

                Contact

                Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                Location: Postsparkasse

                Room: 3rd floor

                Biographical sketch

                Positions

                • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                Education

                • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                Funding

                ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                  Academic Honors and Awards

                  Prizes/awards
                  • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                    Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                  • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                    Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                  • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                    Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                  Teaching

                  • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                  • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                  Research interests

                  There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                  My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                  - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                  - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                  - measurement of Vus
                  - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                  - Machine learning techniques

                  In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                  Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                  My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                  Outreach activities

                  -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                  The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                  -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                  Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                  -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                  -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                  The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                  -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                  Further Information

                  Full list of publications: [link].
                   

                  Rare Event Searches

                  Gianluca Inguglia

                  Junior Group Leader

                  Belle

                  Contact

                  Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                  Location: Postsparkasse

                  Room: 3rd floor

                  Biographical sketch

                  Positions

                  • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                  • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                  • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                  Education

                  • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                  • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                  • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                  Funding

                  ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                  FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                    Academic Honors and Awards

                    Prizes/awards
                    • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                    • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                    • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                      Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                    Teaching

                    • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                    • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                    Research interests

                    There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                    My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                    - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                    - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                    - measurement of Vus
                    - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                    - Machine learning techniques

                    In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                    Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                    My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                    Outreach activities

                    -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                    The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                    -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                    Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                    -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                    -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                    The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                    -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                    Further Information

                    Full list of publications: [link].
                     

                    Theory New Physics

                    Gianluca Inguglia

                    Junior Group Leader

                    Belle

                    Contact

                    Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                    Location: Postsparkasse

                    Room: 3rd floor

                    Biographical sketch

                    Positions

                    • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                    • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                    • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                    Education

                    • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                    • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                    • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                    Funding

                    ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                    FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                      Academic Honors and Awards

                      Prizes/awards
                      • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                      • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                      • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                        Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                      Teaching

                      • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                      • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                      Research interests

                      There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                      My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                      - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                      - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                      - measurement of Vus
                      - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                      - Machine learning techniques

                      In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                      Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                      My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                      Outreach activities

                      -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                      The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                      -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                      Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                      -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                      -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                      The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                      -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                      Further Information

                      Full list of publications: [link].
                       

                      Service Groups

                      Administration

                      Gianluca Inguglia

                      Junior Group Leader

                      Belle

                      Contact

                      Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                      Location: Postsparkasse

                      Room: 3rd floor

                      Biographical sketch

                      Positions

                      • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                      • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                      • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                      Education

                      • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                      • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                      • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                      Funding

                      ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                      FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                        Academic Honors and Awards

                        Prizes/awards
                        • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                        • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                        • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                          Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                        Teaching

                        • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                        • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                        Research interests

                        There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                        My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                        - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                        - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                        - measurement of Vus
                        - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                        - Machine learning techniques

                        In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                        Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                        My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                        Outreach activities

                        -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                        The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                        -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                        Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                        -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                        -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                        The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                        -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                        Further Information

                        Full list of publications: [link].
                         

                        Electronics

                        Gianluca Inguglia

                        Junior Group Leader

                        Belle

                        Contact

                        Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                        Location: Postsparkasse

                        Room: 3rd floor

                        Biographical sketch

                        Positions

                        • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                        • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                        • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                        Education

                        • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                        • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                        • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                        Funding

                        ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                        FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                          Academic Honors and Awards

                          Prizes/awards
                          • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                          • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                          • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                            Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                          Teaching

                          • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                          • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                          Research interests

                          There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                          My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                          - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                          - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                          - measurement of Vus
                          - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                          - Machine learning techniques

                          In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                          Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                          My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                          Outreach activities

                          -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                          The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                          -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                          Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                          -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                          -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                          The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                          -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                          Further Information

                          Full list of publications: [link].
                           

                          IT

                          Gianluca Inguglia

                          Junior Group Leader

                          Belle

                          Contact

                          Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                          Location: Postsparkasse

                          Room: 3rd floor

                          Biographical sketch

                          Positions

                          • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                          • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                          • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                          Education

                          • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                          • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                          • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                          Funding

                          ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                          FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                            Academic Honors and Awards

                            Prizes/awards
                            • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                            • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                            • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                              Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                            Teaching

                            • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                            • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                            Research interests

                            There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                            My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                            - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                            - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                            - measurement of Vus
                            - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                            - Machine learning techniques

                            In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                            Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                            My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                            Outreach activities

                            -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                            The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                            -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                            Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                            -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                            -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                            The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                            -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                            Further Information

                            Full list of publications: [link].
                             

                            Outreach

                            Gianluca Inguglia

                            Junior Group Leader

                            Belle

                            Contact

                            Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                            Location: Postsparkasse

                            Room: 3rd floor

                            Biographical sketch

                            Positions

                            • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                            • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                            • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                            Education

                            • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                            • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                            • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                            Funding

                            ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                            FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                              Academic Honors and Awards

                              Prizes/awards
                              • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                              • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                              • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                                Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                              Teaching

                              • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                              • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                              Research interests

                              There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                              My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                              - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                              - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                              - measurement of Vus
                              - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                              - Machine learning techniques

                              In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                              Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                              My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                              Outreach activities

                              -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                              The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                              -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                              Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                              -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                              -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                              The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                              -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                              Further Information

                              Full list of publications: [link].
                               

                              Machine Shop and Design Engineering

                              Gianluca Inguglia

                              Junior Group Leader

                              Belle

                              Contact

                              Telephone: +43 (1) 51581 - 2828

                              Location: Postsparkasse

                              Room: 3rd floor

                              Biographical sketch

                              Positions

                              • Since 2020 Junior Group leader
                              • From 2017 HEPHY postdoc, Wien (Österreich)
                              • From 2014 to 2017 DESY postdoc Fellow, Hamburg (Deutschland)

                              Education

                              • 2014, PhD degree in Physics, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)
                              • 2011, MSc. degree in Experimental Nuclear Physics, University of Groningen (the Netherlands)
                              • 2008, BSc. degree in Astronomy, University of Bologna (Italy)

                              Funding

                              ERC StG 947006 "InterLeptons: a search for new interactions at Belle II using Leptons"

                              FWF Project Number P 31361-N36, Search for Dark Matter and Dark Forces at Belle II.

                                Academic Honors and Awards

                                Prizes/awards
                                • CHIEN SHIUNG WU DIPLOMA
                                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2011 by Prof. A.Zichichi
                                • LINDENBAUM DIPLOMA
                                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2010 by Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft
                                • DALITZ DIPLOMA
                                  Prize awarded at EMISSP 2009 by Prof. A.Zichichi and Prof. Gerardous 't Hooft

                                Teaching

                                • (since 2021) Precision measurements with quarks and leptons Lecturer at University of  Wien.
                                • (since 2018) Precision measurment with heavy mesons Lecturer at TU-Wien.

                                Research interests

                                There are two research directions at the center of my scientific interests, and in principle in diametrally opposite positions. On the one hand I am interested by the understanding of the smallest objects in the Universe, quarks, leptons, bosons, and their interactions. On the other hand I have recently been attracted more and more by the field of gravitational waves, and in particular those originating from the coalescences of compact objects. The standard model of particle physics (SM) is a theoretical framework that describes fundamental interactions and constituents of matter and, although very successful in predicting phenomena, it cannot be considered as a complete description of nature. Dark matter, for example, is not accounted for in the SM. Some classes of new physics models of interest are those that violate lepton flavor universality (LFUV) and that might also be the link between ordinary and dark matter (DM). My research focuses exactly on this intersection of these topics, the search for the violation of lepton flavor universality and the search for dark matter candidates at the Belle / Belle II experiment (see for example here ). Dark matter however can, in theory, be probed also via gravitational wave detections, as its presence (in the surrounding of coalescing black holes or in the core of coalescing neutron stars) would affect and modify the waveforms of the produced gravitational waves.

                                My involvement at the Belle and Belle II experiment includes the following

                                - search for a dark bosons decaying to visible/invisible final states,
                                - search for lepton flavor universality violation in leptonic/hadronic tau decays.
                                - measurement of Vus
                                - absolute leptonic branching fractions determination of tau
                                - Machine learning techniques

                                In the field of gravitational waves I have recently started to study the case of intermediate-mass black holes. I am developing methodologies of machine learning to study the graviational waves that are produced when these objects are formed by the coalescence of lower mass black holes. This searches can be performed now with the the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA gravitational wave detectors network and in the fuure with the Einstein Telescope.

                                Another aspect of my research is the interest in statistics; for example I serve the Belle II statistics advisory committee as the chairperson since 2021 (co-chair in 2019-2021); the committee offers guidance and documentation (including training/tutorials) to promote sound usage of statistical tools and procedures within the Collaboration.

                                My evolving research team is continuously looking for new members at various level, if you are interested in joining our effort in the search for dark matter and dark forces at the Belle II Experiment write me an email.

                                Outreach activities

                                -WAA Jahrestagung 2017, public lecture, Wien [link]:
                                The fate of antimatter: can the Belle II experiment reveal what happened to the antimatter Universe?
                                -Since 2017 Wien Dark Matter Day, outreach event, Wien [link1][link2]:
                                Dark matter at the Belle II experiment.
                                -Long night of science and DESY open day 2015, Hamburg [link].
                                -Understand the Higgs boson at Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, London, 2013[link]:
                                The Higgs boson and the ATLAS experiment.
                                -KVI open day 2010, Groningen [link].

                                Further Information

                                Full list of publications: [link].
                                 

                                New Staff members