Location

Johann Radon Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics (RICAM)
July 10–14, 2017

Summer School: July 10th-July 12th

Speakers

  • P. Beard (UCL, London)
  • E. Bonnetier (University Grenoble)
  • B. Cox (UCL, London)
  • H. Haddar (INRIA, Paris)
  • R. Leitgeb
  • P. Monk (Delaware, USA)

Workshop: July 13th-14th

This interdisciplinary workshop brings together scientists from Physics, Medical Physics and Mathematics, which are developing models, methods and experiments for Coupled Physics Imaging (CPI). These tomographic techniques use different physical fields for illumination and probing. The prime example in this field is Photoacoustics, which uses (typically) pulsed infrared light for illumination and measures the ultrasonic response of the material. The techniques for modeling the illumination process is typically done with simplified models of Maxwell's equation, the discovery of the possibility of sound waves into electromagnetic waves and vice verse is associated with Alexander Graham Bell. This effect is of inherent use in telecommunication technology. Last but not least, the reconstruction of the imaging parameter of CPI is performed by solving Inverse Problems for the wave equation, which is realized by generalized Radon transform. In this workshop we bring together scientists from these areas to interact on all aspects of CPI.

Organizers

  • M. Bergounioux (Orleans, France)
  • U. Langer (RICAM)
  • O. Scherzer (RICAM)

Office

  • A. Weihs (RICAM)

Scientific Committee

  • G. Bal (Columbia, USA)
  • P. Beard (UCL, UK)
  • A. Litman (Fresnel, France)
  • L. Mindrinos (Vienna, Austria)

Confirmed Invited Speakers

  • G. Alberti (University of Genoa, Italy)
  • S. Arridge (UCL, UK)
  • A. Da Silva (Fresnel, France)
  • P. Elbau (Vienna, Austria)
  • P. Kuchment (Texas A&M, USA)
  • P. Monk (Delaware, USA)
  • K. Ren (Austin, USA)
  • T. Tarvainen (University of Eastern Finland)

Program

Program

School

Mon, July 10
09:00Welcome
09:30–11:00H. Haddar
Overview of so-called qualitative methods in inverse scattering theory (1)
11:00–12:30E. Bonnetier
Integral equations for the modeling of plasmonic resonance of nanoparticles (1)
12:30–14:00Lunch Break
14:00–15:30H. Haddar
Overview of so-called qualitative methods in inverse scattering theory (2)
15:30–15:45Break
15:45–17:30E. Bonnetier
Integral equations for the modeling of plasmonic resonance of nanoparticles (2)
Tue, July 11
09:00–10:30B. Cox
Forward and Inverse Problems in Photoacoustic Tomography (1)
10:30–10:45Break
10:45–12:15R. Leitgeb
Optical Coherence Tomography: Technology and Applications (1)

Ricam-Part_ONE_vRL2.pdf (PDF-File, 48.7MB)
Ricam-Part_TWOvRL.pdf (PDF-File, 20.6MB)
Ricam-Part_THREErevRL.pdf (PDF-File, 31.3MB)
Ricam-Part_FOURrevRL.pdf (PDF-File, 63MB)

12:15–13:30Lunch Break
13:30–15:00P. Beard
Practical aspects of photoacoustic imaging
15:00–15:15Break
15:15–17:00B. Cox
Forward and Inverse Problems in Photoacoustic Tomography (2)
Wed, July 12
09:00–10:30P. Monk
Finite element methods for electromagnetic scattering (1)
10:30–10:45Break
10:45–12:15R. Leitgeb
Optical Coherence Tomography: Technology and Applications (2)
12:15–13:30Lunch Break
13:30–15:00P. Monk
Finite element methods for diffraction gratings (2)

Workshop

(45 min talk + questions)

Thu, July 13
09:00–10:00P. Monk
Stekloff eigenvalues in inverse scatter
10:00–11:00A. Da Silva
Quantitative Photoacoustic imaging "On mice and Men": development of imaging systems, signal information content and processing.
11:00–12:00S. Arridge
Dynamic PhotoAcoustic Tomography
12:00–13:30Lunch Break
13:30–14:30P. Kuchment
Mathematical problems of Compton camera imaging
14:30–15:30K. Ren
Recent Progress on Quantitative Reconstructions in Photoacoustics with Nonlinear Physics
15:30–16:00Break
16:00–17:00G. Alberti
Non-zero constraints in quantitative coupled physics imaging
17:00–18:00Short talks
Fri, July 14
09:00–10:00T. Tarvainen
Quantitative photoacoustic tomography using transport and diffusion models
10:00–11:00P. Elbau

Abstracts

Abstracts

K. Ren
Recent Progress on Quantitative Reconstructions in Photoacoustics with Nonlinear Physics

Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a non-invasive imaging modality that aims at inferring optical properties of heterogeneous media from photoacoustic measurements. I will review some recent mathematical and computational progresses on quantitative reconstructions in different variants of photoacoustic tomography.

 

S. Arridge
Dynamic PhotoAcoustic Tomography

PhotoAcoustic tomography (PAT) has become a powerful new imaging technique combining high-resolution and novel contrast mechanisms as an example of so-called "Coupled Physics Imaging" methods. As in many imaging modalities there is a trade-off between acquisition speed and resolution. This is especially relevent when considering time-varying imaging (4D) and multispectral imaging (5D). In this talk we present recent developments in i) a compressed sensing approach to data acqusition using novel multi-detector/random sampling schemes and ii) the application of novel spatio-temporal regularisation methods.

Joint work with : Paul Beard, Marta Betcke, Ben Cox, Nam Huynh, Felix Lucka, Edward Zhang

 

H. Haddar
Overview of so-called qualitative methods in inverse scattering theory

We shall give first a unified presentation of so-called sampling methods to solve the inverse shape problem, where one would like to reconstruct the geometry of an inclusion from multi-static measurements at a fixed frequency. We put a focus on three methods: the Linear Sampling Method, the Factorization Method and the Generalized Linear Sampling Method. Extension of these methods to handle the case of unknown backgrounds will then be discussed. We finally present how these methods can be used to construct various spectral signatures of the material properties. We end up with some applicative perspectives and open questions.

 

G. Alberti
Non-zero constraints in quantitative coupled physics imaging

The reconstruction in quantitative coupled physics imaging often requires that the solutions of certain PDEs, e.g. the conductivity equation, the Helmholtz equation or Maxwell's equations, satisfy certain non-zero constraints, such as the absence of critical points. From the mathematical point of view, it is then interesting to see whether one can construct suitable boundary values (the illuminations used to probe the object), possibly independently of the unknown coefficients, in such a way that the corresponding solutions satisfy the required properties. In this talk, I will discuss several techniques used for this aim, as well as some negative results.

Accommodation

Accommodation

Invited Speakers:

Our secretary will reserve a room for you at Sommerhaus Hotel very close to the RICAM.

Regular participants/visitors:

We made a provisional reservation of 40 single rooms (from 9–14 July 2017) on special terms (€ 48 per night) at Sommerhaus Hotel very close to the RICAM. The hotel grants the special terms for reservations until 12 June 2017 and the reservation has to be done by yourself via e-mail or fax.

Please mention "Tomographie" with your reservation to receive the special terms.


Hotels

Touristic Sites

If you need help please contact annette.weihs(at)ricam.oeaw.ac.at

Contact

Contact

Office:

Annette Weihs

Email: annette.weihs(at)ricam.oeaw.ac.at

Tel.: ++43 (0)732 2468 5233
Fax: ++43 (0)732 2468 5212

Address:

Johann Radon Institut (RICAM)
Altenberger Str. 69
4040 Linz
Austria