Fairy tales


THE BEAUTIFUL GIRL AND THE SON OF THE TSAR

Description: Fairy tale in the very rarely recorded Meglen Vlach vernacular of Kárpi (Tsrnareka). The theme in the fairy tale told by Katerina Kirku, is the love between the tsar's son and a beautiful girl, a common subject in the fairy tale landscape of Southeastern Europe. Nevertheless, some circumstances like the difficulties that one of the main characters is set to may always vary: within this story, we deal with a role reversal, and we see how a young girl has to experience a long road of difficult exams until she finally reaches the fated love.

Cite as:  Fɛ́ta lítšnă ši tsăréscu fitšór  The beautiful girl and the son of the Tsar; performer: Kirku Katerina; camera/ interview: Andreea Pascaru; transcription/ translation: Andreea Pascaru, Thede Kahl; editor: Ani Antonova, retrieved from www.oeaw.ac.at/VLACH, ID number: megl1237GRV0001a.


VANI AND THE UNREACHABLE BAG

Description: The fairy tale about Vani, a young boy who is sent by his father to graze the oxen, represents a cycle of happenings with symbolic significance of environmental aspects, especially those of interdependence of plants, animals and human beings.

Cite as: Váni ši sicúlʲu ăn pom – Vani and the unreachable bag; performer: Stella Vragali, camera/ interview: Andreea Pascaru, transcription/ translation: Thede Kahl, Andreea Pascaru; editor: Antonio Fichera, retrieved from www.oeaw.ac.at/VLACH, ID number: megl1237GRV0006a.


CHOOCHOO MANJOU AND THE CAT

Description: The narrator of this story is an excellent speaker of Meglen Vlach. Living in Banat, Western Romania, far from her ancestors' place of origin (the village of Lʲumniʦa/Skra in Central Macedonia) and her birth place in Southern Dobrudja (nowadays Bulgaria), she was able to preserve her language very well despite the similarity to the Romanian language. Čučúi̯-Mandžúi̯ (or Choochoo Manjou in our English version for the sake of simplicity) is the Meglen Vlach version of the fairy tale with the child in the shape of a dwarf, well known in many oral folk literatures, e.g. as Tom Thumb in English or Kontorevithoulis in Greek folklore. There are many variants of the fairy tale and different motives (referred to as Aarne Thompson Uther Index 700). In this story, a lonely couple wishes for a child (Motif T553) and finds one whose size is even smaller than a cat. While trying to escape the cat, he falls into the cooking pot, which is why his parents do not find him immediately when they get back home.

Cite as: Čučúi̭-Mandžúi̭ ši mátsa – Choochoo Manjou and the cat; performer: Velica Șuca, camera/ interview: Thede Kahl, Andreea Pascaru, transcription/ translation: Thede Kahl, editor: Antonio Fichera, retrieved from www.oeaw.ac.at/VLACH, ID number: megl1237ROV0001a.