The study of pottery in Limyra takes place in the framework of a variety of contextual reappraisal projects. The chronological period extends from the Classical up until the early Byzantine period. The goal is to create a typological chronology of pottery from Limyra that is as uninterrupted as possible, and to trace the diachronic development of production, consumption and trade.

Research into Hellenistic ceramics

The Hellenistic pottery from Limyra will be placed into a broader context, in the framework of a dissertation project based at LMU Munich and supervised by O. Hülden (OeAI); its significance throughout the entire area of south-west Asia Minor will be investigated. Currently the evidence from the excavations at the so-called West Gate (2011–2012) is being analysed, and in addition the documentation of the ceramics from the excavations at the Xñtabura sarcophagus is being carried out – in spite of its disturbance, a significant and largely cohesive tomb find. The ceramic evidence from the so-called Slope House excavation constitutes an additional component.

Research on the Late Antique-early Byzantine pottery

The material evidence from the excavations in the area of the Late Antique gates in the west and east of Limyra is being examined in order to acquire a better chronological understanding of the two find-spots and their significance in the urban development of Limyra. In addition, the pottery provides important information about the economic framework within which Limyra was integrated from the 5th to the 7th centuries A.D. The ceramic finds include both regional and supra-regional products. Whereas the regional workshops predominantly produced ceramics for daily use, such as jugs, cooking pots, in part glazed tableware and presumably also clay building materials (roof tiles, spacers), the eastern amphorae and the majority of the tableware were primarily all imported; for these latter products, objects were imported from a variety of sources. The high occurrence of Pontic ›Carrot Amphorae‹ in the region of the Late Antique city gates is remarkable; their presence is an indication of the influence of Pontic agricultural products in the eastern Mediterranean region. This phenomenon will also be pursued in the course of subsequent evaluative work.

Hellenistic Pottery

Principal investigator

Duration

since September 2016

Funding

Hanns-Seidel-Stiftung München (graduation grant until December 2020)


Late Antique pottery

Principal investigator

Philip Bes

Duration

since July 2016

Funding