Dr.

Konrad Petrovszky, M.A.

konrad.petrovszky(at)oeaw.ac.at
+43-1-51581-7361
 

KonradPetrovszky is a research associate in the Balkan Studies Research Unit.

Brief Biography


Konrad Petrovszky studied history, philosophy, Slavic studies and political sciences at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich and the Free University of Berlin, where he received his PhD in the history of Southeast Europe. His research was supported by the Gerda Henkel Foundation, the fund for the promotion of young scholars granted by the state of Berlin and the Schroubek Fund 'Östliches Europa'. He held fellowships at the New Europe College in Bucharest and the International Research Centre for Cultural Studies (IFK) in Vienna, and has cooperated on scientific research and documentation projects (e.g. 'Constitutions of the World from the late 18th Century to the Middle of the 19th Century’ by the de Gruyter/Saur publishing house; ‘Zwangsarbeit 1939-1945. Erinnerung und Geschichte’, by the German Federal Foundation ‘Erinnerung, Verantwortung, Zukunft’). Besides his research activity, he worked for many years as freelance editor and translator.

Research Interests


Period: 15th to 19th centuries.
Area: Southeast Europe and the Danube region, Ottoman Empire
Topics: culture and religion (orthodoxy in the Balkans, veneration of martyrs and saints), writing and media (forms and practices of historical writing, book culture), law and administration in the transition to modernity (corruption, legal traditions, territorial organisation)

Selected Publications


  • Marginal Notes in South Slavic Written Culture. Between Practising Memory and Accounting for the Self, in: Cahiers du monde russe 58/3 (2017), 483-502.
  • Die Makellose und ihre unheimlichen Avatare – der Paraskeva-Kult in Südosteuropa als kulturelle Bricolage, in: Kerstin Susanne Jobst, Dietlind Huechtker (Hg.), Heilig. Transkulturelle Verehrungskulte vom Mittelalter bis in die Gegenwart, Göttingen: Wallstein 2017, 115–142.
  • Geschichte schreiben im osmanischen Südosteuropa. Eine Kulturgeschichte orthodoxer Historiographie des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts, Harrassowitz: Wiesbaden 2014.
  • Das osmanische Europa. Methoden und Perspektiven der Frühneuzeitforschung zu Südosteuropa, Leipzig: Eudora-Verlag, Oktober 2013. Hgg. zusammen mit Andreas Helmedach, Markus Koller und Stefan Rohdewald.
  • Romanian Revolution Televised. Contributions to The Cultural History of Media, Cluj-Napoca: IDEA 2011. Hgg. zusammen mit Ovidiu Ţichindeleanu.

Further Publications

Books

Books

Editions and Collections

Editions and Collections

Articles

Articles

  • Konrad Petrovszky: La mission diplomatique de Joseph von Hammer à Jassy. Édition d'une source méconnue, Revue des Études Sud-Est Européennes56 (2018), S. 255-288.
  • Konrad Petrovszky: ‘Those Violating the Good, Old Customs of our Land’: Forms and Functions of Graecophobia in the Danubian Principalities, 16th–18th Centuries, in: Hakan T. Karateke, H. Erdem Çıpa und Helga Anetshofer (eds.): Disliking Others: Loathing, Hostility, and Distrust in Premodern Ottoman Lands, Brighton, MA: Academic Studies Press 2018, S. 187-214.
  • Konrad Petrovszky: Marginal Notes in South Slavic Written Culture. Between Practising Memory and Accounting for the Self, Cahiers du monde russe58 (2017), S. 483-502.
  • Konrad Petrovszky: Pajsije of Janjevo, in: John Chesworth David Thomas (ed.): Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History. Volume 10 Ottoman and Safavid Empires (1600-1700), Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History, Leiden, Boston: Brill 2017, S. 235-244.
  • Konrad Petrovszky: „Wir, die armen Rhomäer“: zur Frage der Selbstverortung der christlichen Geschichtsschreiber im Osmanischen Reich, Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht5-6 (2017), S. 250-264.
  • Konrad Petrovszky: Die Makellose und ihre unheimlichen Avatare – der Paraskeva-Kult in Südosteuropa als kulturelle Bricolage, in: Dietlind Huechtker Kerstin Susanne Jobst (ed.): Heilig. Transkulturelle Verehrungskulte vom Mittelalter bis in die Gegenwart, Göttingen: Wallstein 2017, S. 115–142.
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Other Publications

Other Publications