Moving Byzantium


The widow noblewoman Danielis travels from the Peloponnese to Constantinople (© Ioannis Scylitzae, Synopsis Historiarum, Codex Matrinensis Vitr. 26-2, Facsimile edition. Scientific consultant: Agamemnon Tselikas. Athens (Militos) 2000; ISBN 960-8460-16-6)

The project, financed through the 2015 Wittgenstein-Prize of the Austrian National Research Foundation (FWF) awarded to Claudia Rapp, highlights the role of Byzantium as a global culture and analyses the internal flexibility of Byzantine society. It aims to contribute to a re-evaluation of a society and culture that has traditionally been depicted as stiff, rigid and encumbered by its own tradition. This will be achieved by the exploration of issues of mobility, microstructures and personal agency. The project is conducted in cooperation with the University of Vienna.

Individual research projects deal with the following topics: language multiplicity in Armenia and its impact on the relations to Byzantium (Emilio Bonfiglio), global connections as well as seminomadic groups in the Caucasus (Nicholas Evans, 2016-2017), mobility of elites as well as microstructures and transcultural phenomena in the empire of Nikaia (1204-1261) (Ekaterini Mitsiou), digital tools for the mobility of people and objects as well as concepts of social and spatial theories (Johannes Preiser-Kapeller), organised lay piety and religious group formation (Claudia Rapp), typologies and microstructures of revolt (Yannis Stouraitis, 2016-2017).

Cooperation Partners